FYI on the book stack…

August 24, 2009 at 4:34 pm (Books, Day to Day, Poetry for People, School News, The Famous Stuff) (, , , , , )

That’s not even ALL the books you COULD buy. There’s more! These are the ones, for this semester, I felt I needed. The other recommended ones I am going to do without. We’ll see…

And since I’m on the subject of being all philosophical and thoughtful and embarking on the new path and all, here’s a poem that was in the front of my first nursing book I ever bought, way back in June (ha), and sadly, it tears me up. (tears=crying or tears=ripped up ??–it’s almost the same thing–but I meant crying—don’t judge!)

Being a Nurse Means…

You will never be bored,

You will always be frustrated,

You will be surrounded by challenges,

So much to do and so little time.

You will carry immense responsibility

And very little authority.

You will step into people’s lives,

And you will make a difference.

Some will bless you.

Some will curse you.

You will see people at their worst,

And at their best.

You will never cease to be amazed at people’s capacity

For love, courage, and endurance.

You will see life begin

and end.

You will experience resounding triumphs

And devastating failures.

You will cry a lot.

You will laugh a lot.

You will know what it is to be human

And to be humane.

—Melodie Chenevert, RN

It seems cheesy to say, but I keep it close, so I’ll know, and remember why.

(and i can’t wait to get started!)

0819091925a

0821091825a

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Poetry For People / The Famous Stuff

May 2, 2009 at 10:28 pm (Poetry for People, The Famous Stuff) (, , , , )

This is the second poem in my “Icarus”  trilogy. Finally. Click HERE to see the first one. Then take a look at the one below.

Icarus by Edward Field

Only the feathers floating around the hat

Showed that anything more spectacular had occurred

Than the usual drowning. The police preferred to ignore

The confusing aspects of the case,

And the witnesses ran off to a gang war.

So the report filed and forgotten in the archives read simply

“Drowned,” but it was wrong: Icarus

Had swum away, coming at last to the city

Where he rented a house and tended the garden.

——————————

“That nice Mr. Hicks” the neighbors called him,

Never dreaming that the gray, respectable suit

Concealed arms that had controlled huge wings

Nor that those sad, defeated eyes had once

Compelled the sun. And had he told them

They would have answered with a shocked, uncomprehending stare

No, he could not disturb their neat front yards;

Yet all his books insisted that this was a horrible mistake:

What was he doing aging in a suburb?

Can the genius of the hero fall

To the middling stature of the merely talented?

——————————

And nightly Icarus probes his wound

And daily in his workshop, curtains carefully drawn,

Constructs small wings and tries to fly

To the lighting fixture on the ceiling:

Fails every time and hates himself for trying.

——————————

He had thought himself a hero, had acted heroically,

And dreamt of his fall, the tragic fall of the hero;

But now rides commuter trains,

Serves on various committees,

And wishes he had drowned.

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Poetry For People / The Famous Stuff

April 27, 2009 at 11:57 pm (Poetry for People, The Famous Stuff) (, , , , , , )

This is probably my favorite poem of all time. When someone says “poem”, it’s the one I always think of first. And judging by the rest of the world in websites and blogs, I’m not the only one. So, I know that it has been placed around here countless times, but I’m going to add it in just once more.

I have two other poems on the Icarus theme that I will be posting this week. Those might not be AS popular so it will give a fresh take on an old subject. I even did a critical literary analysis comparing the three for a college paper. Exciting stuff. Maybe if someone asks nice or begs originally, I’ll just post it on up. And if nobody says anything, I might just post it anyway.

Here it is. The one, the only:

Musée des Beaux Arts by W. H. Auden

About suffering they were never wrong,

The Old Masters: how well they understood

Its human position; how it takes place

While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;

How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting

For the miraculous birth, there always must be

Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating

On a pond at the edge of the wood:

They never forgot

That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course

Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot

Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer’s horse

Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.

In Brueghel’s Icarus, for instance how everything turns away

Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may

Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,

But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone

As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green

Water; and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen

Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky

Had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.


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The Famous Stuff

April 9, 2009 at 1:31 pm (Poetry for People, The Famous Stuff) (, , , )

I think alot of people get introduced to Robert Frost early on. I know I did. It’s at school. Or in life somewhere.  It’s in one of the more famous movies: “The Outsiders”.  But it was a BOOK first.  The author, S.E. Hinton,  includes this Frost poem in her book. It’s a main theme. Keep in mind, Ms. Hinton, was 17 when she wrote the book. I have always been in awe of that skill. So this is my first of the famous:

Nothing Gold Can Stay by Robert Frost

Nature’s first green is gold,

her hardest hue to hold.

Her early leaf’s a flower;

But only so an hour.

Then leaf subsides to leaf.

So Eden sank to grief,

So dawn goes down to day.

Nothing gold can stay.

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